A new spirit of patriotism: my filing speech

I delivered this speech on the steps of the Buncombe County Board of Elections after filing as a candidate for Asheville City Council, on Monday, June 6.
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I have just filed as a candidate for a seat on the Asheville City Council. I do so in part as an answer to President Barack Obama’s call for a new spirit of patriotism. It is also partly my answer to the first presidential speech I can remember hearing as a child, when another young president suggested we not ask what our country could do for us, but to ask what we could do for our country.

[photo by Edwin Shelton]

The patriotism I embrace is that of concern for the people of my country and my state and my community. To that end I echo Obama’s call for volunteerism, donating volunteer hours myself and encouraging others to join hands and hearts to lift up our community.

One lesson I have taken from our recent and ongoing economic collapse is that we shouldn’t count too much on passing along monetary wealth to our children. We have seen how suddenly dollar wealth can disappear due to forces far beyond our control. The important things we can create for our heirs are cultural and institutional. If we leave them well educated, with a society more firmly rooted in justice and equal opportunity and participatory democracy, we have left them more prepared to move ahead in their own lives. If we leave them an infrastructure that enables conservation of resources with cleaner air and reliable sources of water and food, we have handed them important tools for self-reliance. If we have moved along toward renewable energy systems and transportation modes that will work into the future, we will have given a lift not only to our children, but succeeding generations.

In Asheville, if we leave our heirs a city as beautiful as the city we have come to love, we will have left them both a beautiful place to live out their lives, and a place that will continue to attract others who patronize our businesses and bring new businesses into our midst, who purchase our arts and crafts and tune in to our music, who enrich our lives with their own stories and take home memories to share with others.

If, on the other hand, we guide our lives and our policies to enable short-term monetary gains, to use the resources of today’s taxpayers to underwrite pie-in-the-sky promises from outsiders only interested in cashing in on Asheville’s natural and cultural riches, we undercut our own and our children’s futures. We will burn today’s wood and leave ashes for those who follow.

I am convinced public policy should encourage conservation, through utility rate incentives and by using public borrowing power to help retrofit existing homes and businesses.

I am convinced public policy should protect current taxpayers rather than play the game called “increasing the tax base,” which has resulted in increased taxes for people in Asheville and hundreds of other growth-directed communities across the country.

I feel sure that a healthy, interdependent, locally focused economy can benefit the people who live here now, with increased job opportunities, particularly green jobs, and resulting in a community with higher real security in terms of food, water and energy.

And I have come to understand that the world is facing some very challenging times as we pass peak oil production and begin to address the most urgent crisis our species has ever faced, global climate change. The next decade will be critical in determining whether we make a smooth transition to sustainability or leave our children to ride an unpredictable roller coaster of economic upheaval and environmental disarray. Global warming is actually a local problem everywhere. It will have to be addressed city by city and business by business and home by home. It is a challenge we can only solve here and it is a challenge we can only meaningfully address now. If we succeed we will surely be remembered in our turn as the greatest generation and be ready to hand off that mantle to the next.

This weekend I celebrated the 4th of July like many of you, with friends and families, reenacting traditions that go back many years. In our case we went white-water rafting and canoeing on the French Broad river and camped up in Hot Springs. We shared sweet corn and watermelon and hot dogs while we sat around a campfire and stayed up late to watch fireworks while children played with old fashioned sparklers.

As happens so often when I’m camping, I thought about something my father taught me when I was a Boy Scout. He said, Cecil, when you leave a campsite, you should always leave it cleaner than you found it, better for the next person who comes that way. That’s a rule I have always tried to follow, where I camp, where I work, where I live. I even try to leave a few sticks of firewood as a gift to the next camper who passes by.

Of course, when you’re in a public campground, the sites are well used,the fire pit is a permanent fixture and there are remnants left by many previous campers. But out in the wilderness, I’ve always practiced what they call “no-trace” camping. That’s where you leave a campsite in the pristine condition you found it, so no one coming after would know that you had been there. If some thoughtless previous visitor left a mess, you clean that up too. In other words, you “keep it real” for the next person who comes along. I hope to serve Asheville as a member of city council for the next four years, and I will do my very best to leave this place better than I found it. I will do my best to keep it real.

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